Darnley v Croydon Health Services NHS Trust [2017] EWCA Civ 151; Court of Appeal divided over whether an A&E receptionist owes a duty of care

In this blog Vanessa Cashman of 12KBW considers Darnley v Croydon Health Services NHS Trust where the Court of Appeal considered what, if any duty, is owed by a receptionist of an A&E department to a patient in respect of the provision of information. By a majority it was held that no duty is owed to provide correct information about waiting times.

The facts

On 17 May 2010 the claimant was the victim of an assault, in the course of which he received a violent blow to the head. He was taken to A&E by a friend and they arrived at 8.26pm. On speaking to the receptionist on his arrival, she told him that he might not be seen for up to 4 or 5 hours. The claimant was in significant pain and after 19 minutes of waiting, he decided to go home and take paracetamol. He left at 8.45pm, without notifying the receptionist. Continue reading “Darnley v Croydon Health Services NHS Trust [2017] EWCA Civ 151; Court of Appeal divided over whether an A&E receptionist owes a duty of care”

Merrix v. Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust [2017] EWHC 346 (QB); Costs budgeting

This is a post by Andrew Roy and Alex Carrington of 12 King’s Bench Walk

An important decision in the changing world of cost budgeting.

Facts :

The Appellant bought a claim against the Respondent for damages for clinical negligence. Proceedings were commenced and the Appellant’s budget was approved at a CCMC. Following the exchange of lay and witness evidence, but before the parties had prepare for the trial, the parties compromised the claim. The Appellant produced a costs bill that was less than the total approved budget (unsurprising given the matter had settled before trial). Continue reading “Merrix v. Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust [2017] EWHC 346 (QB); Costs budgeting”

The Discount Rate Decision: Right or Wrong, Gilt Edged or Double Edged?

In this post Henry Charles of 12 King’s Bench Walk considers the implications of the recent change to the discount rate.

Minus 0.75%.

The initial reaction: claimant nirvana …and if so for how long?

The Lord Chancellor’s statement heralded the new rate with the assertion that minus 0.75% was the only answer on a gilts based assessment: Continue reading “The Discount Rate Decision: Right or Wrong, Gilt Edged or Double Edged?”