Consent, causation and Chester  – the Court of Appeal examines the modified test in Duce v Worcestershire Acute Hospitals NHS Trust [2018] EWCA Civ 1307

This blog is by Vanessa Cashman of 12 King’s Bench Walk.

Summary

The claimant underwent a total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy in order to treat extremely painful and heavy periods. She was 41 years old at the time.

The operation was performed non-negligently on 25 March 2008. Following surgery the claimant developed Chronic Post-Surgical Pain as a result of nerve damage. The issues were whether she was properly consented in respect of the risk of post-operative pain and whether she could establish causation. Continue reading “Consent, causation and Chester  – the Court of Appeal examines the modified test in Duce v Worcestershire Acute Hospitals NHS Trust [2018] EWCA Civ 1307”

Surgical consent case report: materiality of risk – Montgomery vs Bolam

B v An NHS Trust

Isaac Hogarth of 12KBW instructed by Joel Onyems of OP Law (representing the Claimant) discusses a recent case which settled at JSM. The case is of particular interest due to the arguments concerning the objective nature of the test of materiality under Montgomery v Lanarkshire Health Board [2015] UKSC 11 and its interplay with Bolam principles.

Continue reading “Surgical consent case report: materiality of risk – Montgomery vs Bolam”

LOST IN TRANSLATION: the importance of ensuring that medical advice is understood by the patient.

In this post Ted Cunningham of 12KBW examines the recent High Court decision in NILUJAN RAJATHEEPAN v BARKING, HAVERING AND REDBRIDGE NHS FOUNDATION TRUST [2018] EWHC 716 (QB). The case highlights the importance of proper and effective communication between medical professionals and patients who do not have a good grasp of English. In circumstances where medical professionals believe that they have communicated effectively, that belief must be objectively reasonable.

Continue reading “LOST IN TRANSLATION: the importance of ensuring that medical advice is understood by the patient.”

Meadows v Khan – wrongful birth: are additional unconnected disability costs recoverable?

In this post Vanessa Cashman of 12KBW discusses the recent decision of Yip J in Meadows v Khan [2017] EWHC 2990 (QB), a  case concerning the recoverability of additional costs arising out of a disability unconnected with the negligent failure to diagnose that led to a wrongful birth.

Continue reading “Meadows v Khan – wrongful birth: are additional unconnected disability costs recoverable?”

Failure to obtain informed consent: is there a free-standing right to damages?

In this post Farhana Mukith discusses the case of Shaw v (1) Kovac & (2) University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust [2017] EWCA Civ 1028, in which the Court of Appeal considered whether compensation for the unlawful invasion of a patient’s personal rights ought to be recognised as a separate and free-standing cause of action.

Continue reading “Failure to obtain informed consent: is there a free-standing right to damages?”

ABC v St George’s Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust [2017] EWCA Civ 336: Does a doctor owe a duty of care to disclose a hereditary disease to a patient’s child?

In this post Rachit Buch of 12KBW discusses the Court of Appeal’s recent reversal of Nicol J’s decision to strike out a claim on the basis that a doctor did not owe a duty of care to disclose a patient’s hereditary disease to his child.

Overturning the decision the Court of Appeal held that it was arguable that medical practitioners could be liable for failing to inform family members of a diagnosis where there was definite, reliable and critical medical information as would be the case in clinical genetics.

Continue reading “ABC v St George’s Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust [2017] EWCA Civ 336: Does a doctor owe a duty of care to disclose a hereditary disease to a patient’s child?”

Thefaut v Johnston [2017] EWHC 497 (QB) (14 March 2017); informed consent, materiality and experts whose independence is called into question

In this blog Thea Wilson of 12KBW considers the recent judgment of Thefaut v Johnston in which Green J provides his characteristic clarity of thought on informed consent, materiality in the context of consent and how to deal with medical experts whose independence is called into question.

The facts

The Claimant developed back pain in late 2011. Although it resolved relatively speedily, it reoccurred at the end of January/start of February 2012. After having some treatment through the NHS, the Claimant consulted the Defendant privately in March 2012. The Defendant was described by the Court as a surgeon of long standing, good repute and vast experience. At a consultation on 15th March 2012, the Defendant recommended conservative treatment. He later wrote to the Claimant’s GP noting that her real concern was back pain rather than slight numbness in her left leg. Continue reading “Thefaut v Johnston [2017] EWHC 497 (QB) (14 March 2017); informed consent, materiality and experts whose independence is called into question”